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Overview
In this part of the session, you will learn how best instructional practice in a highly literate social studies classroom would work within a conceptual unit framework. You will review and discuss how the learning experience you just went through is supported in a Conceptual Unit. You will also review and discuss the process of creating a conceptual unit.

construction.jpg
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Objectives
The learning objectives associated with this part of the session are:
1. What resources are available to assist with the implementation of NCSCoS.
2. What it means to be literate in Social Studies.
6. How to develop an implementation plan utilizing the strategies learned to facilitate local curriculum.
7. How to apply the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards in the Social Studies classroom.

Aligned North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards
Standards I - Teachers demonstrate leadership.
Standards III - Teachers know the content they teach.
Standards IV - Teacher facilitate learning for their students.
Standards V - Teachers reflect on their teaching.

Learning Targets
After this part of the session, participants will be able to do the following statements:
- I can understand how a learning experience fits within a conceptual unit.
- I can visualize a graphic outline of a conceptual lesson plan and unit.
- I can differentiate between a learning experience and performance task.








Disciplinary literacy



Disciplinary literacy is anchored in the specifics of individual disciplines.Each discipline has its own unique knowledge core and its own ways of inquiring, investigating, reasoning, representing,


and forming driving questions in the field. The following chart provides a comparison of disciplinary literacy. Disciplinary literacy focuses on the specialized skills used in different fields of study and


how experts in approach reading and writing within their disciplines. How do the experts in the various fields of social studies read and write within their disciplines? In other words, what do economists


or historian consider when they read a text? What does literacy look like through the lens of a political or behavioral scientist? How do geographers write a text to be understood by others in their field?




Comparison of Content-area Literacy to Disciplinary Literacy (Shanahan, 2010)


Content-Area Literacy
Disciplinary Literacy
Reading experts (1920s)
Wide range of experts
Generalized skills
Specialized, discipline specific skills
Use of reading and writing to learning information
Use of literacy skills to make meaning within a discipline
Geared toward remedial students
Geared toward all students
Often encourages use of literary texts
Focuses only on discipline-specific texts
Graphics are ignored or taught generally
Graphics are specific to the discipline




What Experts In The Various Disciplines Of Social Studies Consider When They Read And Write Within Their Field







Check Your Understanding Of Disciplinary Literacy In Social Studies









I. Questions to Consider When Developing a Conceptual Unit (30 minutes)
Now that we have gone through our learning experience, let’s use this as a building block to develop a unit lesson planner.

When brainstorming our unit, we need to address the following questions:
- What conceptual lens will you use to develop your unit?
- What are the Clarifying Objectives that support your unit?
- What are the major concepts you will cover in your unit?
- What are some generalizations you can make about the unit topic?
- What are some guiding questions (factual, conceptual, and provocative) that can guide your unit?
- What is the critical content that you want to cover in your unit? This can include topics and facts.
- What key skills students will need to use in this unit? What Common Core Literacy Standards for History and Social Studies support your unit?
- How will you assess this unit? How will your performance task/assessment be differentiated? Where will your assessment lie in the Revised Blooms Taxonomy Table?
- What activities or learning experiences will be imbedded in your unit?
- What resources and teacher notes are needed to implement this unit?

*Here is the word document for individuals who prefer to have a downloadable version for note taking purposes.






Disciplinary literacy

Disciplinary literacy is anchored in the specifics of individual disciplines.Each discipline has its own unique knowledge core and its own ways of inquiring, investigating, reasoning, representing,
and forming driving questions in the field. The following chart provides a comparison of disciplinary literacy. Disciplinary literacy focuses on the specialized skills used in different fields of study and
how experts in approach reading and writing within their disciplines. How do the experts in the various fields of social studies read and write within their disciplines? In other words, what do economists
or historian consider when they read a text? What does literacy look like through the lens of a political or behavioral scientist? How do geographers write a text to be understood by others in their field?

Comparison of Content-area Literacy to Disciplinary Literacy (Shanahan, 2010)
Content-Area Literacy
Disciplinary Literacy
Reading experts (1920s)
Wide range of experts
Generalized skills
Specialized, discipline specific skills
Use of reading and writing to learning information
Use of literacy skills to make meaning within a discipline
Geared toward remedial students
Geared toward all students
Often encourages use of literary texts
Focuses only on discipline-specific texts
Graphics are ignored or taught generally
Graphics are specific to the discipline

What Experts In The Various Disciplines Of Social Studies Consider When They Read And Write Within Their Field


Check Your Understanding Of Disciplinary Literacy In Social Studies





II. Helpful Templates When Creating a Conceptual Unit (30 minutes)
After the unit development brainstorm, look at the templates to see how your answers can support a conceptual unit.

*Here are the templates (graphic and written) for outlining a conceptual unit lesson plan.




III. Examples of a Conceptual Unit (15 minutes)
Here are some examples (graphic and written) of a conceptual unit lesson planners from the session.

K-5

6-12


puzzle man.jpg
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IV. Reflection on the Process (15 minutes)
1. Whole Group Discussion - Discuss at your tables and as a whole group:
How does the learning experience and/or performance task reflect these key components?
- Integrated Thinking
- Conceptual Focus
- Inquiry
- Active Engagement


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Additional Resources

Unit Development Resources
- "It’s a process" Poster

- Concept-Based Curriculum and Instruction for the Thinking Classroom by H. Lynn Erickson
- Conceptual Based Resource Kit
- Unit Development Template

DPI Resources

- Live Binder

Social Studies Literacy
- Sites for four components
Common Core State Standards in History/Social Studies Chart

Technology Resources
- Penzu.com

Disclaimer


Digital tools used during the course of this presentation have been helpful to some educators across the state. However, due to the rapidly changing digital environment, NCDPI does not represent nor endorse that these tools are the exclusive digital tools for the purposes outlined during the presentation.